265 Area Code

    area code

  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada
  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.

    265

  • * Gallienus repels the invasion of the Goths in the Balkans. * The general of Gallienus’ army, Victorinus, defects to Postumus. * Gallienus gives the order to fortify Milan and Verona.
  • 260 (two hundred [and] sixty) is the magic constant of the n×n normal magic square and n-queens problem for n = 8, the size of an actual chess board.
  • To call in Malawi, the following format is used: There are no city codes for Malawi

265 area code

265 area code – Mitel 5304

Mitel 5304 IP Phone ~ Part# 51011571 NEW
Mitel 5304 IP Phone ~ Part# 51011571 NEW
?Mitel 5304 IP Phone is a cost-effective entry-level display phone that provides access to the features and applications enabled by Mitel IP-based IP communications platforms. This two-line, dual-port IP phone with a 40-character backlit display supports both SIP and MiNet protocols and works behind the Mitel 3300 and Mitel SX-200 IP Communications Platforms (ICP). It is specifically suited to be deployed in areas where a small footprint is required: cruise ship cabins, hotel guest room phones, university dorms, classrooms or beside a cash register in the retail environment. ?Features of the 5304 IP Phone include: ?Two x 20 backlit display (with auto-dimming) ?Two lines with LED indication: one prime line and one programmable key with LED ?Eight programmable keys: speed dials, features access codes, paging, conferencing, voicemail access etc. ?Paging & page receive capability ?Direct page & group page support ?Dual-mode: MiNet and SIP support ?Incoming call visual indication ?Message waiting indication ?Adjustable volume / ringing controls ?Wall-mountable (optional) ?Multiple powering options (802.3af compliant) ?ADA-compliant (HAC handset) ?Small footprint (26.5 cm x 10cm or 10.5″ x 4″) ?Designed for power conservation: reduces power consumption for overall energy savings ?

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low
A US Air Force (USAF) MH-53M Pave Low IV helicopter from the 21st Special Operations Squadron, Royal Air Force (RAF) Mildenhall, pulls a hard left over a suspected hostile site in Northern Iraq while on a routine combat mission.
The Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low series is a long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopter for the United States Air Force. The series was upgraded from the HH-53B/C, variants of the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion. The HH-53 "Super Jolly Green Giant" was initially developed to replace the HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant". The helicopters later transitioned to Special Operations missions. The U.S. Air Force’s MH-53J/M fleet was retired in September 2008 and was replaced by the CV-22B Osprey.
Design and development
The US Air Force ordered HH-53B and HH-53C variants for Search and Rescue units, and developed the MH-53J Pave Low version for Special Operations missions.
The Pave Low’s mission was low-level, long-range, undetected penetration into denied areas, day or night, in adverse weather, for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces. Pave Lows often work in conjunction with MC-130H Combat Talon for navigation, communications and combat support, and with MC-130P Combat Shadow for in-flight refueling.
The large green airframe of the HH-53B earned it the nickname Super Jolly Green Giant. This name is a reference to the smaller HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, a stretched variant of the H-3 Sea King, used in the Vietnam War for combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) operations.
HH-53B
The US Air Force favorably regarded their Sikorsky S-61R/HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopters and was interested in the more capable S-65/CH-53A. In 1966, the USAF awarded a contract to Sikorsky for development of a CSAR variant of the CH-53A.
A HH-53B of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron refueling from a HC-130P Hercules over North Vietnam, 1969-70

The HH-53B, as it was designated, featured:

A retractable in-flight refueling probe on the right side of the nose.
Spindle-shaped jettisonable external tanks with a capacity of 650 US gallons (2,461 L), fitted to the sponsons and braced by struts attached to the fuselage.
A rescue hoist above the right passenger door, capable of deploying a Forest penetrator on 250 feet (76 m) of steel cable.
Armament of three pintle-mounted General Electric GAU-2/A 7.62 mm (.308 in) six-barreled Gatling-type machine guns, with one in a forward hatch on each side of the fuselage and one mounted on the tail ramp, with the gunner secured with a harness.
A total of 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor.
A Doppler navigation radar in the forward belly.
Early HH-53Bs featured T64-GE-3 turboshafts with 3,080 shaft horsepower (2,297 kW) each, but these engines were later upgraded to T64-GE-7 turboshafts with 3,925 shaft horsepower (2,927 kW). Five crew were standard, including a pilot, copilot, crew chief, and two pararescuemen.
HH-53C
An HH-53C lowering a PJ during a rescue mission, June 1970
The HH-53B was essentially an interim type, with production quickly moving on to the modestly improved Air Force HH-53C CSAR variant. The most visible difference between the HH-53B and HH-53C was that the HH-53C dispensed with the fuel-tank bracing struts. Experience with the HH-53B showed that the original tank was too big, adversely affecting performance when they were fully fueled, and so a smaller 450 US gal (1,703 L) tank was adopted in its place. Other changes included more armor and a more comprehensive suite of radios to improve communications with C-130 tankers, attack aircraft supporting CSAR actions, and aircrews awaiting rescue on the ground. The HH-53C was otherwise much like the HH-53B, with the more powerful T64-GE-7 engines.
A HH-53 seen from the gunner’s position of a helicopter over Vietnam in October 1972
A total of 44 HH-53Cs were built, with introduction to service in August 1968. Late in the war they were fitted with countermeasures pods to deal with heat-seeking missiles. As with the HH-53B, the HH-53C was also used for covert operations and snagging reentry capsules, as well as snagging reconnaissance drones. A few were assigned to support the Apollo space program, standing by to recover an Apollo capsule in case of a launchpad abort, though such an accident never happened.
In addition to the HH-53Cs, the Air Force obtained 20 CH-53C helicopters for more general transport work. The CH-53C was apparently very similar to the HH-53C, even retaining the rescue hoist, the most visible difference being that the CH-53C did not have an in-flight refueling probe. Since CH-53Cs were used for covert operations, they were armed and armored like HH-53Cs.
A good number of Super Jollies were converted into Pave Low special-operations helicopters.[7] PAVE or Pave is a USAF code name for a number of weapons systems using advanced electronics.
HH/MH-53H
The USAF’s Super Jollies wer

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low

US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low
A US Air Force MH-53 Pave Low from the 20th Expeditionary Special Operations Squadron parked in Iraq after the last combat mission of the Pave Low on Sept. 27, 2008. The MH-53 Pave Low is being retired after nearly forty years of service to the United States Air Force.
The Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low series is a long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopter for the United States Air Force. The series was upgraded from the HH-53B/C, variants of the Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion. The HH-53 "Super Jolly Green Giant" was initially developed to replace the HH-3 "Jolly Green Giant". The helicopters later transitioned to Special Operations missions. The U.S. Air Force’s MH-53J/M fleet was retired in September 2008 and was replaced by the CV-22B Osprey.
Design and development
The US Air Force ordered HH-53B and HH-53C variants for Search and Rescue units, and developed the MH-53J Pave Low version for Special Operations missions.
The Pave Low’s mission was low-level, long-range, undetected penetration into denied areas, day or night, in adverse weather, for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply of special operations forces. Pave Lows often work in conjunction with MC-130H Combat Talon for navigation, communications and combat support, and with MC-130P Combat Shadow for in-flight refueling.
The large green airframe of the HH-53B earned it the nickname Super Jolly Green Giant. This name is a reference to the smaller HH-3E Jolly Green Giant, a stretched variant of the H-3 Sea King, used in the Vietnam War for combat search-and-rescue (CSAR) operations.
HH-53B
The US Air Force favorably regarded their Sikorsky S-61R/HH-3E "Jolly Green Giant" long-range combat search and rescue (CSAR) helicopters and was interested in the more capable S-65/CH-53A. In 1966, the USAF awarded a contract to Sikorsky for development of a CSAR variant of the CH-53A.
A HH-53B of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron refueling from a HC-130P Hercules over North Vietnam, 1969-70

The HH-53B, as it was designated, featured:

A retractable in-flight refueling probe on the right side of the nose.
Spindle-shaped jettisonable external tanks with a capacity of 650 US gallons (2,461 L), fitted to the sponsons and braced by struts attached to the fuselage.
A rescue hoist above the right passenger door, capable of deploying a Forest penetrator on 250 feet (76 m) of steel cable.
Armament of three pintle-mounted General Electric GAU-2/A 7.62 mm (.308 in) six-barreled Gatling-type machine guns, with one in a forward hatch on each side of the fuselage and one mounted on the tail ramp, with the gunner secured with a harness.
A total of 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of armor.
A Doppler navigation radar in the forward belly.
Early HH-53Bs featured T64-GE-3 turboshafts with 3,080 shaft horsepower (2,297 kW) each, but these engines were later upgraded to T64-GE-7 turboshafts with 3,925 shaft horsepower (2,927 kW). Five crew were standard, including a pilot, copilot, crew chief, and two pararescuemen.
HH-53C
An HH-53C lowering a PJ during a rescue mission, June 1970
The HH-53B was essentially an interim type, with production quickly moving on to the modestly improved Air Force HH-53C CSAR variant. The most visible difference between the HH-53B and HH-53C was that the HH-53C dispensed with the fuel-tank bracing struts. Experience with the HH-53B showed that the original tank was too big, adversely affecting performance when they were fully fueled, and so a smaller 450 US gal (1,703 L) tank was adopted in its place. Other changes included more armor and a more comprehensive suite of radios to improve communications with C-130 tankers, attack aircraft supporting CSAR actions, and aircrews awaiting rescue on the ground. The HH-53C was otherwise much like the HH-53B, with the more powerful T64-GE-7 engines.
A HH-53 seen from the gunner’s position of a helicopter over Vietnam in October 1972
A total of 44 HH-53Cs were built, with introduction to service in August 1968. Late in the war they were fitted with countermeasures pods to deal with heat-seeking missiles. As with the HH-53B, the HH-53C was also used for covert operations and snagging reentry capsules, as well as snagging reconnaissance drones. A few were assigned to support the Apollo space program, standing by to recover an Apollo capsule in case of a launchpad abort, though such an accident never happened.
In addition to the HH-53Cs, the Air Force obtained 20 CH-53C helicopters for more general transport work. The CH-53C was apparently very similar to the HH-53C, even retaining the rescue hoist, the most visible difference being that the CH-53C did not have an in-flight refueling probe. Since CH-53Cs were used for covert operations, they were armed and armored like HH-53Cs.
A good number of Super Jollies were converted into Pave Low special-operations helicopters.[7] PAVE or Pave is a USAF code name for a number of weapons systems using advanced electroni

265 area code

Furnitech FT36TL 36" Classic Modern TV Console
The Very Popular Furnitech FT Series is Now Available in a 36″ Size!
The Deep Wenge Finish is Perfect for Today’s Modern Decor’s.
A Wonderful “Floating Top” and Tapered Legs Add to the Unique Design of the FT36TL Console.
Tempered Smoked Glass Doors Framed with Solid Cherry Wood.
The Hardware on the Furnitech FT36TL is Sculpted Stainless Steel.
2 Adjustable Shelves in the Cabinet Area Provide Ample Room for Components. Usable Interior Cabinet Dimensions: 19.69″ H x 26″ W x 16.14″ D
An Open Shelf Center Channel Speaker Compartment.
Perfect for Smaller DLP, Plasma, and LCD TVs.
A Ventilated Back Panel with an Internal Wire Management System Gives You All the Features of Huge Consoles.
This fine piece of furniture ships directly from Furnitech’s warehouse Fully Assembled! Dimensions: 36″ W x 36.20″ H x 17.7″ DWeight: 119 lbs. MATCHING COFFEE & END TABLES NOW ALSO AVAILABLE
Two great matching cordinates are available for this console. Constructed of the same quality materials and finished to match your console.
Choose a coffee table or end table to match your new TV console! Each piece is available separately or order multiples for even more savings.
Take the guess work out of matching pieces and receive your entire media room set in one delivery.
Mix and match or choose one of our great packages. Multiple quantity discounts available-call us for details.
Ships fully assembled with your console. Dimensions:Coffee Table: 54″ L x 16″ H x 26.5″ D Weight: 126lb.End Table: 26.78″ L x 25.75″ H x 25.25″ D Weight: 81 lbs. mfg code: Furnitech FT36TL

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